Extension

Poultry Disease Workshop for Ohio Practicing Veterinarians

PI: Mohamed El-Gazzar

This project is intended to cover activity 4.5: The poultry population in the United States is now evolving into two subpopulations; the commercial poultry industry and backyard, game birds and other noncommercial poultry. Noncommercial poultry population is much more fragmented and much more dispersed in comparison with the commercial poultry. Due to recent social trends, this population is predicted to quadruple over the next few years. In addition to that, this population doesn’t have easy access to veterinary health care. Most small animal or mixed animal veterinary practices don’t have much expertise in servicing poultry. For the aforementioned reasons, noncommercial poultry represents a significant challenge when it comes to poultry disease surveillance diagnosis and control. The purpose of this project is to provide education and training for practicing veterinarians in the State of Ohio, who are witnessing an increasing number of poultry patients in the form of a full day workshop. Trained veterinarians after this workshop should be able to take poultry cases and provide a much needed basic veterinary services to the increasingly popular backyard poultry. Additionally, trained veterinarians could provide an avenue for collecting data on noncommercial poultry. In this project, veterinarians after completing their workshop training will be offered a chance to enroll in voluntary survey that is intended to evaluate the impact of the this training workshop on participating veterinarians and their clinics. But the survey could also provide approximate data on geographical location, species, incidence and prevalence of different diseases in the noncommercial poultry population. The planned progression of this 5 years project is as follows:

Yearly Goals:

Year 1:

Plan, prepare and hold 1 full day workshop targeting 15 – 20 small animal and mixed veterinary practitioners in the State of Ohio. A full day workshop with hands on poultry disease training should serve as a strong starting point for veterinarians who are interested in learning these skills.

Year 2:

Plan, prepare and hold 3 full day workshop targeting 15 – 20 small animal and mixed veterinary practitioners in the State of Ohio. The workshops will be held in each of three large urban centers in Ohio including Columbus, Cleveland and Cincinnati to make it easier for participating veterinarians to attend.

Year 3:

Plan, prepare and hold 3 – 5 full day workshop targeting 15 – 20 small animal and mixed veterinary practitioners in the State of Ohio. In addition to the three previously mentioned large urban centers, other relatively smaller urban centers could be targeted as well.

Year 4:

Plan, prepare and hold 3 – 5 full day workshop targeting 15 – 20 small animal and mixed veterinary practitioners in the State of Ohio. In addition to the three largest urban centers in Ohio, other relatively smaller urban centers could be targeted as well.

Year 5:

Plan, prepare and hold 3 – 5 full day workshop targeting 15 – 20 small animal and mixed veterinary practitioners in the State of Ohio. In addition to the three largesy urban centers in Ohio, other relatively smaller urban centers could be targeted as well.

Outcome:

By the end of the project roughly 200 veterinarians practicing in the state of Ohio would be trained to provide basic veterinary services to noncommercial poultry. Additionally, the information gathered from the surveys will be used to evaluate the impact of the workshop on the participating veterinarians and their clinics. But also can provide approximate poultry disease data from the noncommercial poultry. The data from both commercial and noncommercial poultry could be overlaid on one data base that can be used for poultry disease surveillance, monitoring, prevention, control and eradication planning.

 

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